¡Hola, El Perú!: Museo Rafael Larco Herrera 1

1 In that beautiful grayness of wintertime Lima, the garden is as lovely as what is inside the museum.

garden 22

flowers 3

flowers 42

above nearstoreroom

near storeroomTo the left is the storeroom, there are thousands of pieces which have been cataloged and not part of the permanent collection. It was the only place they asked us not to shoot in.

near storeroom 2This little courtyard has that look of colonial Spain.

lorca hoyle

Rafael Larco Hoyle is the founder and son of Rafael Larco Herrera. Larco Hoyle was born in Perú, but spent his earlier years as a student in the United States. From a smaller collection of archeological ceramic works his father had collected, he began to purchase and cateogorize ceramic artwork of his native country. This eventually led to this structure, named after his father, but created and promoted archeological research. The museum opened its doors to the public in 1926.

cases

There are actually two collections. The second is a collection of erotic works, which I will cover in another post. This post will cover the first part of the collection and the beautiful setting of the museum. Lima has many museums, but this and the pyramid, are two which are indigenous of Peruvian history and culture, and both are located in the capital city.

cupisnique owls stirrup handleCupisnique owls with stirrup handle

map figureMap of primary indigenous languages in Peru and classic Moche pottery.

This thumbnail on map on indigenous peoples was based upon a more complex one at www.ethnologue.com Although the common language of Perú is Spanish, legally all indigenous languages are recognized as official languages by the Peruvian government. The peoples here are often ancient and predate the pre-Columbian Inca empire. The names of peoples have less to do with language names on the map, but give you an idea the complexity of individual ancient indigenous peoples in Perú and the surrounding countries.

formative cupisniqueFormative Cupisnique, notice the colored slip and burnishing, common among the later Moche.

goblets lambayeque Lambayeque ceremonial goblets, gold and silver alloy

moche necklacesMoche necklaces

moche ear ornaments

gold necklace silver shirtMoche earrings (top, above) and necklace (directly above, left). The shirt (right) is made of silver sheets attached to a cloth for wearing.

moche epoch goldAll that glitters. Spanish soldiers saw this and became convinced they had come to the promised land.

gold and silverBoth gold (Moche) and silver (Chimu) were used, as were alloys, for color. Gold for sun, silver for moon.

moche headdressMoche head dress.

h1

h2

h3 for real

The beauty of the pieces, which were numerous gives an idea that gold was used for the higher echelon, and involved with spiritualism. The Spanish quest for gold and silver, actually mistook this, as a large abundance of gold and silver mines. The sickest outcome of the whole thing is in Seville, where both the spoils of war (as well as people) can be seen on display in many Catholic Churches.

moche pots

moche musician compositeMoche musicians

The Moche pottery has always fascinated me, as the faces have so much character to them. Some of the faces you still see, and it reminds me of paintings by Velazquez, Goya and Renoir, where certain types have been sealed in history for infinity. Where you can tell heritage, because the face was captured by the artist and progeny from there resembled the original ancestor. I know this, as I found my own young profile in a Raphael. So here, I have seen these faces, sometimes with Ecuadorians.

moldWooden mold and cast clay piece

display 2

They actually have tons of these Moche stirrup male faces. Aside from the museum, there is also a storeroom of pieces, broken down into categories. Those shown here are incredible, while so ritualistic, these faces hold their own individual character. I have always admired the technique of working with colored slips and burnishing.

moche heads

moche head and detail

The Moche pottery has always fascinated me, as the faces have so much character to them. Some of the faces you still see, and it reminds me of paintings by Velazquez, Goya and Renoir, where certain types have been sealed in history for infinity. Where you can tell heritage, because the face was captured by the artist and progeny from there resembled the original ancestor. I know this, as I found my own young profile in a Raphael. So here, I have seen these faces, sometimes with Ecuadorians.

display

An anthropologist collects for years, and makes a museum out of the pieces he has discovered and cataloged. You have to admire the display of this well laid out, well thought out museum, which is dedicated to preserving the history of peoples we would really know nothing about. Pretty impressive, huh?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s